2D COMP

 


 


 

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COLOR

37CE0795-3C52-444F-87B0-738CA442527E2:50 p.m.

69B1C3FC-F0E0-445E-8E31-785DCE43ADF9.JPG3:20 p.m.

DE61DD7D-5A28-4D83-88E5-AF575B2162A3.JPG3:50 p.m.

B8A2267D-9413-48E9-87DA-4FACCD5023254:20 p.m.

949971F8-70E1-4AF0-B2B6-9F8522B1106C4:50 p.m.

4793879E-3075-480B-9E13-02CE5F6F856D5:20 p.m.

69B1C3FC-F0E0-445E-8E31-785DCE43ADF95:50 p.m.

8BF83DDA-7E51-4092-9991-573B50E18130.JPG6:20 p.m.

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DIGITAL GRAB BOX

One artist who I believe successfully employs motion is Carrie Moyer. Her use of motion is especially apparent in her piece, “In a Cool Blaze.” This piece is successful because of the distinction between the front, middle, and background, which encourages the eye to easily and quickly move through the composition.

Another artist who uses motion in their artwork is Ingrid Calame. One of her pieces, which I love, “Tracing From the Indianapolis Motor Speedway I,” uses motion wonderfully. With the base being a map, the route lines paired with the clumps of color and lines motioning downward, forces the eye to peacefully move around the surface. The white, which appears to be the foreground, also makes the viewer feel like they’re moving through the space.

Yet another artist employing motion is Gerard Ritcher, who uses motion in quite a different way. His piece, “Bomber,” shows what Is assumed to be missiles falling. The cool thing though is that although we do not see the objected literally fall, our brain picks up the action and allows the motion to happen .

2.1(A)

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FINAL RESULT

DRAW BAG

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EMOJIS

OVERLAPPING/TRANSPARENCY

FIGURE/GROUND

VERTICAL LOCATION

LINEAR PERSPECTIVE

SIZE CHANGE

ILLUSTRATIONS

CIRCLES FOUND IN EVERYDAY LIFE